Breakfast at Tiffany’s

Rating:

Hepburn’s Charm Carries This Romantic Drama

Main Cast: Audrey Hepburn, George Peppard, Patricia Neal, Mickey Rooney
Director: Blake Edwards

Plot Summary: A young writer meets a wild, carefree young woman when he moves into a new apartment and is pulled into her glamorous world.

Perhaps best known for Ms. Hepburn’s singing of the title song Moon River, Breakfast at Tiffany’s is mostly light and frothy, but because it was written by Truman Capote, it has elements of bite and satire buried within the sugar.

Paul Varjak (Peppard) is a young writer who moves into (is moved into) a new apartment. It quickly becomes apparent that he is a “kept” man, dancing to the tune of an older woman (Neal). He meets a young woman named Holly (Hepburn), who also seems to be cut from the same cloth as he: she is obligated to visit an older, richer man in prison at least once per week. She also throws big parties to lure the rich and famous in for hopeful catching. It’s a tribute to the acting and tone of the film that neither character is portrayed in a negative light…we are meant to sympathize with them and wish them well.

As their relationship grows closer, Paul finds out that Holly does not come from sophisticated roots: far from it. But she’s done the best she could, and aspires to more, perhaps more than Paul can give to her. Or can she give up her dreams of big money and settle down with a humble writer?

This is a solid drama, with interesting characters and a meaty plot. Only the character played by Mr. Rooney is jarring in this day and age: it is highly offensive and, frankly, not funny. But it was, however, a product of its time.

This is a good psychological study and relationship movie, brought to life by the charm, beauty, and energy of Ms. Hepburn. I can definitely recommend it on that basis alone, if nothing else.

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